predator precautions

Black-Bear-Sow-1.jpg

bears

 

Behaviour: Bears are omnivores animals, meaning they eat both plant and animal material to survive. They are opportunistic foragers and will take advantage of seasonal changes and food opportunities made available to them. In the spring this may be young mammals, in the summer berries, and the fall salmon. Humans often provide access to unnatural food sources like fruit trees and garbage that can lead to habituation. Habituation is an irreversible state when an animal is repeatedly exposed to the same stimuli without repercussion. Getting into unsecured garbage, for example, becomes a learned behaviour of which the bear does not soon forget. This can have negative consequences for the bear and our community members. 

Managing attractants: 

1) Secure garbage in the garage or shed until the morning of collection.​

2) Protect livestock with an electric fence and shelter.​

3) Pick fruit trees and prevent windfall.​

4) Do not feed wildlife and refrain from using bird feeders.​

5) Freeze organic waste to prevent it from smelling.​

6) Clean BBQ after every use.​

7) Feed pets indoors.​

8) Store pet and livestock feed in a bear-resistant location.​

9) Keep the yard free of all attractants.​

10) Be wild wise and report bear encounters.

10300038_680265082041395_846051906434661

Hibernation: In nature, there is a seasonal lull in food availability throughout the winter. Wild animals have various mechanisms for dealing with this. Some migrate, some develop different foraging techniques while others hibernate. Bears are animals that hibernate when food availability decreases over the winter months.  In the fall, bears enter a stage of hyperphagia where they consume copious amounts of calories to fatten up in preparation for hibernation. These fat stores will sustain the bear over the winter months. During hibernation, heart rate, respiration rate and metabolism all decrease drastically. Movement and output (waste) are minimal. The bear will stay nestled in its den until early spring although it may occasionally wake briefly. If a bear has access to a food source (like garbage) it will be reluctant to hibernate. People must manage their attractants so bears stay safe and wild and go into hibernation.

Safety: If you see a bear from a secure location (like your home) – stay inside. Scare the bear away by making noise via your voice, banging pots and pans, air horn, etc... The bear must know it is not welcome close to our homes. 

If you see a bear while out in nature, stay calm and give the bear space. Back away from the area and alert other hikers to the bear’s presence. Avoid surprise encounters by hiking in groups, talking or singing to yourself. Always keep pets on a leash and have bear spray readily available. DO NOT RUN OR SCREAM. Talk to the bear in a calm deep voice. You can make yourself look big by outstretching your arms. Keep small children and pets close by. Report bear sightings so others can be made aware.

Report: Report bear sightings and interactions so we can help spread awareness and information to nearby neighbours and encourage coexistence between bears and our community. Everything is kept confidential and specific locations will not be shared outside of our program. 

CONTACT US HERE

68781732_2528653890490650_1017704857408110592_o.jpeg
priscilla-du-preez-6bZQonml5do-unsplash.jpg

COUGARS

 

Safety: If you see a cougar from a secure location (like your home) – stay inside. Scare it away by making noise via your voice, banging pots and pans, air horn, etc.. It is important that the cougar knows it is not welcome close to our homes. 

If you see a cougar while out in nature, stay calm and give it space. Back away from the area and alert other hikers to the cougar’s presence. Avoid surprise encounters by hiking in groups, talking or signing to yourself. Always keep pets on leash and have bear spray readily available. DO NOT RUN OR SCREAM. Talk to the cougar in a calm deep voice. You can make yourself look big by outstretching your arms. Pick up small children and keep pets close by. Report cougar sightings so others can be made aware.

July 01, 2018 - Cougar 1.jpg

Behaviour: Cougars are typically elusive and solitary animals. Despite Vancouver Island having the highest density of cougars in the world, sightings are relatively infrequent. Cougars are carnivores, meaning they eat other animals to survive. They prefer to stalk their prey and use the element of surprise to pounce on prey. Cougars are also called mountain lions and pumas. No matter what you call them, these large cats are quick, agile and considered apex predators (top of the food chain).

Managing Attractants: Unsecured livestock and free-roaming pets can be attractants for cougars. Although they typically prefer to keep their distance from humans, they may be drawn closer to our homes if given the opportunity of an easy meal. It is imperative to the safety of people, pets, livestock, and wildlife that all attractants are well secured. A well-maintained electric fence and secure shelter are strongly encouraged as well as the prevention of free-roaming pets. Consider installing a “catio” and walking dogs on leash.

Report: Report cougar sightings and interactions so we can help spread awareness and information to nearby neighbours and encourage coexistence between cougars and our community. Everything is kept confidential and specific locations will not be shared outside of our program. 

CONTACT US HERE

thomas-bonometti-dtfyRuKG7UY-unsplash-2.jpg

WOLVES

 

Safety: 

If you see a wolf (or wolves) from a secure location (like your home) – stay inside. Scare it away by making noise via your voice, banging pots and pans, using an air horn, etc... They must know they are not welcome close to our homes. 

If you see a wolf (or wolves) while out in nature, stay calm and give it space. Back away from the area and alert other hikers to its presence. Avoid surprise encounters by hiking in groups, talking or singing to yourself. Always keep pets on a leash and have bear spray readily available. DO NOT RUN OR SCREAM. Talk to the wolf in a calm deep voice. You can make yourself look big by outstretching your arms. Pick up small children and keep pets close by. Report wolf sightings so others can be made aware.

67635284_2516761848346521_4630959546729234432_n.jpg

Report: 

Wolf sightings are becoming more common. This can be both exciting and nerve-racking for people. We want to get out ahead of this and spread education on how people can coexist with the growing wolf presence. Wild Wise has teamed up with Coexisting with Carnivores Alliance to create a special group dedicated to wolf-related education. 

 

If anyone has information on wolves they would like to share with us please email: wildwise123@gmail.com or call our wildlife reporting line: 250-880-8371. 
Everything is kept confidential and specific locations will not be shared outside of our program. Thank you, we can work together to help protect the wolves and our community.

Behaviour: Wolves are typically pack animals although they may be spotted on their own as well (lone wolf). They are opportunistic omnivores, meaning they eat plant and animal material and their diet changes based on the seasonal availability of food. Wolf packs are dynamic and ever-changing hierarchy. Pack leaders, called “alphas’ are the only individuals permitted to mate. All other pack members assist in raising the pups which are typically born in the spring. Wolves are vocal animals and are known for howling. This helps unify the pack and aid in communication between members.

Managing Attractants: Unsecured livestock and free-roaming pets can be attractants for wolves. Although they typically prefer to keep their distance from humans, they may be drawn closer to our homes if given the opportunity of an easy meal. It is imperative to the safety of people, pets, livestock, and wildlife that all attractants are well secured. A well-maintained electric fence and secure shelter are strongly encouraged as well as the prevention of free-roaming pets. Consider installing a “catio” and walking dogs on leash. DO NOT FEED WOLVES.